Answering Patients’ Call for a MPN Treatment

Impact Biomedicines was founded to address the unmet needs of patients with myelofibrosis and polycythemia vera, two life-threatening diseases classified as myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN).

Myelofibrosis (MF) is a serious bone marrow disorder that disrupts the body’s normal production of blood cells. The result is extensive scarring in the bone marrow often with debilitating symptoms such as splenomegaly (enlarged spleen), hepatomegaly (enlarged liver), anemia, fever, and other conditions.

MF may develop on its own or result from Polycythemia Vera (PV) or Essential Thrombocythemia (ET), the third in the group of MPN diseases. PV is a slow-growing blood cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many red blood cells. These excess cells thicken blood, slowing its flow, which often leads to complications such as blood clots. ET is characterized by the production of too many blood platelets resulting in fatigue, lightheadedness, headaches and vision changes.

A Patient Community with Limited Treatment Options

Today, 18,000 people in the United States are living with MF, while PV affects 100,000 people. Although both MF and PV can occur in persons of any age, they are more common later in life, in both men and women 60 years of age and older. Twenty percent of people with MF have a 10-year risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Fifteen percent of people with PV may develop MF, while progression from ET to MF is less common.1

MPN are characterized by the mutations of JAK2, MPL or CALR genes but the mutational activation of JAK2 is the primary driver of disease. Current research suggests that many patients with MF are unable to tolerate, do not respond or become refractory to current JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor therapy.

“There are very limited therapeutic options for these patients,” says John Hood, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of Impact. “At Impact, we are focused on innovation where it’s needed most, and we believe the selective inhibition of JAK2 may represent a promising treatment strategy.”

Article Sources

1 MPN Research Foundation

Answering Patients’ Call for a MPN Treatment

Impact Biomedicines was founded to address the unmet needs of patients with myelofibrosis and polycythemia vera, two life-threatening diseases classified as myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN).

Myelofibrosis (MF) is a serious bone marrow disorder that disrupts the body’s normal production of blood cells. The result is extensive scarring in the bone marrow often with debilitating symptoms such as splenomegaly (enlarged spleen), hepatomegaly (enlarged liver), anemia, fever, and other conditions.

MF may develop on its own or result from Polycythemia Vera (PV) or Essential Thrombocythemia (ET), the third in the group of MPN diseases. PV is a slow-growing blood cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many red blood cells. These excess cells thicken blood, slowing its flow, which often leads to complications such as blood clots. ET is characterized by the production of too many blood platelets resulting in fatigue, lightheadedness, headaches and vision changes.

A Patient Community with Limited Treatment Options

Today, 18,000 people in the United States are living with MF, while PV affects 100,000 people. Although both MF and PV can occur in persons of any age, they are more common later in life, in both men and women 60 years of age and older. Twenty percent of people with MF have a 10-year risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Fifteen percent of people with PV may develop MF, while progression from ET to MF is less common.1

MPN are characterized by the mutations of JAK2, MPL or CALR genes but the mutational activation of JAK2 is the primary driver of disease. Current research suggests that many patients with MF are unable to tolerate, do not respond or become refractory to current JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor therapy.

“There are very limited therapeutic options for these patients,” says John Hood, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of Impact. “At Impact, we are focused on innovation where it’s needed most, and we believe the selective inhibition of JAK2 may represent a promising treatment strategy.”

Article Sources

1 MPN Research Foundation